Hiking Clothing Choices – Naths hiking gear part 2 – Going lightweight

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Hiking Clothing Choices – Naths hiking gear part 2 – Going lightweight. Following on from his previous video on the subject of weight reduction in his backpack, Nath continues down the same…



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19 Responses to “Hiking Clothing Choices – Naths hiking gear part 2 – Going lightweight”

  1. I see you have Amazon links to these products, are they the exact same fleece and jacket as you were wearing? Also, how did you find the fit, compared to the ordered size? I noticed a few of the jackets reviews saying you should get at least a size bigger. At just over 15 stone and 5' 10, I normally get a large or XL if a tight fit, just wondered how you found the sizing? Sorry for all the questions, Cheers Alan

  2. GO Dartmoor! says:

    We will be interested to see how you get on with the Regatta rain jacket, always trying to find a better breathable solution 👍 oh yes power to the Crocs people 😉

  3. Tony yates says:

    Howdo Nate, I'd say the 5000 could be the hydrostatic head, or, the waterproof rating.
    Anything over 10,000+ is considered good, its really subjective though, because everyone builds up heat differently, the one thing thats imperative for a waterproof jacket are pit zips,, you need to dump heat quickly if you get overheated and pit zips are the best.
    The other thing you look for in a jacket is the MVTR or the moisture vapour transfer rate, this needs to be at least 10,000+ for a good jacket.
    MVTR is the jackets ability to let sweat vapour out and reduce the build up of moisture inside the jacket during heavy exertion.
    This is just my opinion and I realise that budgets are different but paying that bit more for a good shell jacket will pay off on the hills.
    The Montane minimus is a great jacket that can be sourced quite cheap if you buy online and look for past season models.
    Hope that helps Nate.

  4. Very informative Nath. Never really got my layer system right. Still figuring it out lol. All the best Cheers Karl

  5. Stu Bloggs says:

    Well filmed Nathan, clear and to the point………..waterproof jackets have 'ratings' as you'll know, a hydro-static head of 10,000mm+ and breathability of 7000mvp should handle the British weather, anything less will struggle…………Regatta are making some good stuff lately, Isotex is Regattas own waterproof,breathable material coupled with a DwR finish, it comes in differing quality, the higher the hydro-static head, the better it is………………….hydro-static-head is just a technical term for how much water a material will let-in at a given column height ie 10000mm. I have owned a Regatta 5000mm and it did handle a lot of rain but being out all day on a wet moor it started to let in the water.
    The hydrostatic head for a waterproof jacket varies from manufacturer to manufacturer and from fabric and technology used. The level of waterproofing depends on the requirements and design purpose of the jacket. As a rule of thumb guide an hydrostatic head of 3000 is decent waterproofing, however if the jacket is used with a rucksack a much higher value will be needed. e.g. Gore-tex which has a minimum rating 20,000 when the jacket is new.

  6. Paint your face white and you'll look like a Smurf 😉 Great kit viddy though Nath, keep them coming. Lee (Burton Outdoors)

  7. I don't think I've ever seen Nath this bubbly/happy lol. It's taken a good few years of review watching and then bargain hunting for me to find the right bits of kit. End of season sales, black friday, bidding on ebay have all helped so just take your time fella's. Atb Sconja 👍

  8. "There's no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing!"

  9. Found that really useful, i can see some sponsorship deals coming up in the future 👌🏽

  10. Nice vid Nath. Just to chuck my two pennies worth in – if you haven't already, grab yourself a technical T shirt. It will really help with moisture and heat control. As much as I love the Summit Or Nothing T's cotton base layers offer little when it comes to layering and in some circumstances can be dangerous.

  11. George Post says:

    Great job Nath.

    Can anyone explain the difference between "soft" and "hard" shell jacket?

  12. I'm a recent light weight convert. Go outdoors will price match and 10% almost any obscure website you can find. Interesting vid anyways.

  13. One of the best buys I ever made was a Hi-tec hooded fleece from Go Outdoors… but they've stopped selling them. I wished I had bought more than one of them now. It's really difficult to get a cheap fleece with a hood on it for men. Plenty of women ones. And they are really useful in the winter.

  14. Sheffield Bushcraft getting comment likes up for  finding the better prices. Might be worth adding to videos. Isotec 5000 normally means waterproof and breathable levels. As in a tents water proof level.

  15. Waxman says:

    Ebay is a wonderful thing. Do your research online then check out eBay, get some great bargains. Aliexpress is worth a look online, a bit like a Chinese Amazon they do some great lightweight outdoor gear, most of the gear over here is made in China and sold at 3-4 times the price. "The lighter your pack the more you'll enjoy your walking, the heavier the pack the more you'll enjoy your camping" good luck

  16. great video. only just got round to catching up on your adventures. I purchased the osprey atmos 65 2 years ago and more or less regret it . it's too big I end up taking more than what I need . . you and Trev got a great channel.

  17. Manufacturers typically rate jackets using two numbers. The first, in millimeters, describes how water resistant it is. If you were to stand a 1 in. by 1 in. tube over the jacket’s fabric, and then fill it with water, doing so would measure how high the water would have to be before it started leaking through.

    In the case of a 10K jacket (or 10,000mm), you could stack a 1 in. by 1 in. column of water 10,000mm high before it even started to seep through the fabric’s other side—that’s almost 33 feet!

    A rating of up to 10K is enough to handle light to average rain for a short amount of time. Ratings between 10K and 15K can handle a moderate amount of rain for much longer, and jackets rated between 15K and 20K or higher are serious shells for heavy, intense rain over a prolonged period.

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