Backpacking Gear I'm OVER in 2019

1568145791_maxresdefault.jpg



Stuff/Gear I Mention in this Video ** Dirty Girl Gaiters – BD Carbon Cork Trekking Poles – Carbon Tent Pole …



source

You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.

43 Responses to “Backpacking Gear I'm OVER in 2019”

  1. What Backpacking/Hiking Gear are you OVER in 2019? What NEW GEAR are you replacing it with?

    👇Let Us Know Down Below!👇

  2. Gaitors. Can't live without them! Year later..Gaitors…worthless. ??????

  3. Gchi Gimaa says:

    Everything old becomes new again. Hikers have used 1 “trekking pole” for decades. its called a walking stick! I wonder what else will come back…

  4. A.J. Hart says:

    So, how many of you are going to quickly forget that you may have blown $30-$500 on gear based strictly on the recommendation of a YT hiker, and are champing at the bit to do so again as the new reviews are rolled out?

    My advice: Figure out what you need, then look for reviews to find the best one for how YOU hike – not someone who does through-hikes for thousands of miles. Sometimes solutions are one size fits all, but often they are not.

    Regardless, it's a better approach than watching vids THEN concluding on your own that you suddenly need something you had no intention of getting 10 minutes earlier.

  5. anon mouse says:

    That one displeased him.

  6. I would definitely loose the douchebag appearance. But alas, you’re stuck with that.

  7. I can see why people want to change gear, but I'd like to offer an alternative view:
    Changing gear all the time is obviously expensive. This is money you either really need, or might spend elsewhere (apart from the Billionaires among us).
    I am changing gear, but it's buying a tent instead of borrowing one and getting a lighter cooking system bought second hand from a friend. My sleeping bag, though heavy, stays but replacing it is on the wish list.
    My rucksack is not as comfortable as I thought, but that will stay and probably will only be replaced when it's worn out.
    Also, I only have positive memories from my early hiking days, when heavy gear was basically the only option. Also, being able to carry more weight adds a challenge to my training schedule.
    Making do can also be a challenge, especially for those who want to go back to basics.
    And lastly: doing away with old gear and buying new can be a strain on the environment if the old gear is not being re-used by someone else.
    I would hate to see hiking become a threat to the natural places we love so much as a result of our consumerism.

  8. Love my frameless glock backpack with belt on it. I don’t stress about ounces, but carry as few things as possible. And with ya on one pole. I’ve carried that wooden walking stick I whittled on in grandpas garage, back when I was a kid, all over the country. Wouldn’t trade it for anything.

  9. Sean Burke says:

    Man I’m over water reseviors/camel pack type things lol

  10. Good advice. Do us a favor, though and tàke a moment to spell "though," not "tho."

  11. Dave Classon says:

    Frameless pack = Hot back IMHO

  12. Eric B. says:

    MY TAKE:
    1. low gaiters-> great for keeping snow out of shoes and warming feet a bit – useless otherwise
    2. trekking poles-> old geezers like me need two AND the straps for much greater efficiency and comfort.
    3. tall cook pots-> inefficient compared to wide pots of equal volume. I like 3 cup volume
    4. frameless packs-> Aaaarrggghh! I love frame packs & padded hip belts. All the weight on my shoulders/spine is anathema (to me).

    I'm OVER any ti cookware, quilts, frameless packs and water filters. (INSTEAD: anodized aluminum pots, Ul down mummy bags, UL framed packs and a Steripen and Katadyn chlorine dioxide tablets and 6 #1 coffee filters IF needed)
    But HYOH and enjoy it.

  13. Jeremy says:

    Do you and the wife share a one person tent? No wonder you call her snuggles(cuddles?).

  14. Daniel Brown says:

    I'm just here for the chest hair

  15. Brett G says:

    5 Pieces of Gear I wouldn't Hike without: Gaiters
    Gear I'm Over in 2019: Gaiters

    That was quick, haha

  16. Tito Taufik says:

    I wont do
    -stoveless/coldsoak
    -quilt
    -trail running shoes (in my place its jungle/tropical rain forrest)
    -small hand flashlight
    -frameless pack

  17. Hiker Porter says:

    This year in 2019 I am done with my tent, the eureka solitaire, and I’m switching to a tarp.

  18. T K says:

    How about using the bear energy storage method. Eat lots of food for a month or two before the backpacking trip to pack on body fat. Pack less food on the trip and utilize the energy stores from the body fat you packed on before the excursion. The body is the most efficient way to store calories… LOL 😉

  19. Dear Darwin: Your videos are great for all us us learning and refining our backpacking gear and techniques. 
    I was interested to see that both you and Austin Davis (notabadplacetopee.com) have both abandoned gaiters and trekking poles. As a 56-year old backpacker with far less experience, I would encourage you to temper your advice. I am distracted and irritated by schmutz in my shoes, but I imagine that after thousands of miles your feet and Austin's are pretty tough. Gaiters would become superfluous.
    In terms of trekking poles, they are still phenomenally useful to me to make minor corrections and prevent falls. My balance is not as good as it was at 40, despite hiking/backpacking, yoga, ballet, figure skating and running. I imagine that your trail gait ergonomics, efficiency and balance have made it possible to case aside trekking poles.
    Your deep breadth of experience make some gear unnecessary – please don't forget those of us with fewer trails miles under our feet.

  20. Dear Darwin: Your videos are great for all us us learning and refining our backpacking gear and techniques. 
    I was interested to see that both you and Austin Davis (notabadplacetopee.com) have both abandoned gaiters and trekking poles. As a 56-year old backpacker with far less experience, I would encourage you to temper your advice. I am distracted and irritated by schmutz in my shoes, but I imagine that after thousands of miles your feet and Austin's are pretty tough. Gaiters would become superfluous.
    In terms of trekking poles, they are still phenomenally useful to me to make minor corrections and prevent falls. My balance is not as good as it was at 40, despite hiking/backpacking, yoga, ballet, figure skating and running. I imagine that your trail gait ergonomics, efficiency and balance have made it possible to case aside trekking poles.
    Your deep breadth of experience make some gear unnecessary – please don't forget those of us with fewer trails miles under our feet.

  21. Gort Newton says:

    I use thick canvas gaitors, from boot top to just under knee.

  22. Edith Kyle says:

    Threw away the wrong pole

  23. R. S. Morell says:

    you swore you would never get rid of your Dirty Girls gaiters, wow I am shocked…but you still get sand and rocks in your shoes, oh well!

  24. Sad that something as wonderful as hiking and camping seems to have a new commercialisation lobby via YouTube… buy buy buy… rebuy… throw stuff away that you’ve only used once (and help the environment)… jeez, sad to see the exploitation of one of the purest activities there is. Obviously just my personal opinion on these kinds of videos.

  25. Ju-Lin Wang says:

    Nice video 👍 always very informative!

  26. This dude looks just like Shay Carl

  27. Nick Torok says:

    Hey, if you don't want that I'll take it. 😀

  28. NGMonocrom says:

    Not surprised that the Vargo BOT is out. Vargo should have worked on correcting the two main issues with it. Though admittedly, with titanium, the cross threading and galling issue was always going to be a problem to one extent or another. Perhaps the pressurising issue could have been solved or even reduced with a different O-ring design.

    The BOT is just odd. Cold soaking can be done with a bunch of different containers. All available for incredibly cheap. Especially a plastic peanut butter jar with much smoother threads. (You can literally get a generic brand of P.B. at Target in a standard 16oz. plastic jar for $1.29 instead of paying $98.71 more for the smaller of the two BOTS.) As far as a cook pot/mug, who wants to deal with something that might not open? Just lift off the top on literally every single other Ti pot/mug on the market. The BOT just doesn't do either job well.

  29. NaeMuckle says:

    Hope you liked Scotland. Love your videos

  30. OddHal9000 says:

    WA State in the 🏠

  31. moranarevel says:

    Could have have your 1 trekking pole, I'm disabled and need a longer cane

  32. John Parsons says:

    I am over 50, I don't bounce like I did at 20 if I stumble and fall. I don't fall anymore with two trekking poles for all the hiking I do. This guy doesn't realize the wear and tear on his knees over time not using two poles. If you want to be hiking in your 80s, use the poles in your 30s and beyond

  33. Me2Speed3 says:

    What is the brown tape you mentioned in one video? Cant find the video and cant seem to find the tape.

  34. Johnny West says:

    Good video. But I use BOTH of my hiking poles. LOL

  35. Ben Mills says:

    This year I'm ditching my Sherpa and my backup Sherpa. I think if you have access to an endless array of gear, you can be quite flippant and toss out things and replace at your own desire. However, for those who are a little more limited, it's best to get the most versatile gear you can that will serve you best no matter what trail or the type of weather. That to me is being resourceful and it reflects making good informed decisions.

  36. I love Talenti! I use there mango/ raspberry sorbet containers for art supplies (after downing the sorbet in one sitting). Great for carrying ink. Never spilled ink while carrying them. And now they’re good for hiking too? Sweet.

  37. The mini gaiters look useful, but could't they make them in less clownish colours? Geeze…

  38. You're like Diogenes. You just keep getting rid of more and more material things. Finally you'll be naked with just a wooden cup for drinking.

  39. Hi, is 40l frameless pack is enough for a first time PCT hiker? Seems quite small for me, thanks 🙂

  40. DIB 001 says:

    You get rid of snuggles too?

  41. Kim AndGetMe says:

    He needed to discard stuff so he could make this video.

  42. kate rounds says:

    What's your base weight

  43. True Darwinism, soon we’re all naked & afraid on trail – UL in its purest form 😜 Keep up the great work love your videos but couldn’t help myself! Safe hike🤙

Leave a Reply

Powered by AWS
Skip to toolbar